Why mother's day is celebrated?


Mother's Day is a celebration honoring the mother of the family, motherhood, motherhood and the impact of mothers on society. In many parts of the world, it is celebrated on different days, usually in March or May. It completes celebrations such as Father's Day and Grandmother's Day.

In the early twentieth century, Modern Mother's Day began in the United States with the initiative of Anna Jarvis. It is not (directly) associated with many traditional mothers and motherhood ceremonies around the world for thousands of years, such as Greek worship of Sibyl, Rhea the Great Mother of Gods, Roman Festival Hilaria, or Christian Mothering Sunday. Motherhood in fact, but in memory of the Mother Church). However, in some countries, Mother's Day is still a synonym for these old traditions.

The modern version of US-originated Mother's Day has been criticized as too commercial. The founder, Jarvis himself, regrets this commercialism and commented that it was not her intention.

Anna Jarvis remembers her mother in 1908 at St. Andrew's Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia. Today's Mother's Day is celebrated. Andrews Methodist Church now hosts the International Mother's Day Church. Her campaign to turn Mother's Day into an accepted holiday in the United States began in 1905, the year her mother Anne Reeves Jarvis died. Ann Jarvis was a peace activist who looked after wounded soldiers on both sides of the American Civil War and created Mother's Day Work Clubs to address public health issues. Anna Jarvis wanted to honor her mother and set aside a day to honor all mothers by continuing the work she started because she believed that a mother was "someone who has done more for you than anything else in the world."

In 1908, the US Congress rejected the idea of ​​celebrating Mother's Day as a holiday, ridiculing them for celebrating "Mother's Day." 1910). In 1914, Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation celebrating Mother's Day, the second Sunday of May as a national holiday to honor mothers.

Although Jarvis was successful in establishing Mother's Day, she became frustrated with Holiday Commercial. In the early 1920s Hallmark Cards and other companies began selling Mother's Day cards. Jarvis believes that companies have misunderstood and exploited the idea of ​​Mother's Day and that the holidays are about profit, not emotion. As a result, they boycotted Mother's Day and threatened to sue organized organizations. Jarvis argued that instead of buying gifts and pre-arranged cards, people should greet and honor their mothers with handwritten letters expressing their love and gratitude. Jarvis protested at a candy conference in Philadelphia in 1923 and at the 1925 American War Mothers meeting. Jarvis was arrested for disturbing the peace.
Happy Mother's Day to all
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